BREAKING NEWS: PIN–UP 25, THE HOME ISSUE, IS OUT NOW. READ THE LETTER FROM THE EDITOR AND WATCH THE VIDEO

“Home, the saying goes, is where the heart is. And while it’s a heartwarming proverb, it’s cold comfort to the billion-plus people in the world without adequate housing. Of course the definition of “home” goes beyond any physical space we build or choose for ourselves — it’s also a mental construction, a place of longing, an inviolable boundary between ourselves and the rest of the world. Which explains why we devote such considerable resources to our homes, sustaining entire industries in our efforts to protect them from intruders and the elements, make them safe for children, not to mention decorating them. No wonder, then, that the particular breed of American horror film, the home-invasion story, holds such a special place in the collective subconscious. The classic suburban home, often the subject of such movies, was long regarded as an incubator that breeds and upholds the social order, but its place in society is increasingly threatened: home-ownership rates have been dropping since the housing crisis, the classic nuclear family is transforming into ever more complex configurations, the so-called sharing economy turns homes into hostels, and the digital realm competes with the real world in the meaningful experience of space. But while our physical homes are slowly adjusting to changing demographic, economic, environmental, and technological realities, aesthetic signifiers persist, mutating in manifold ways — providing comfort and identity-defining points of connection. So whether your home is virtual or real, big, small, or miniature, this issue is an effort to reconcile the sometimes pathological desire for metaphysical belonging with the very real need to tszuj up your four walls. Because it’s one thing to find yourself homesick, but the last thing you want is to be sick of your own home.”

Felix Burrichter
Editor/Creative Director

GET THE ISSUE HERE

PIN–UP 25, Fall Winter 2018/19, featuring:

MARIE-JOSÉ VAN HEE
After a half-century career, this Belgian trailblazer still subscribes to an unhurried way of life yet shows no signs of slowing down.
Interview by Alexandra Cunningham Cameron
Portraits by Jef Jacobs

TEZONTLE
The Mexican duo’s material experimentations, on the border of art and architecture, unearth rocky mythologies of national identity.
Interview by Daniel Simon Ayat
Portraits by Dorian Ulises López Macías

MARTHA ROSLER
With an uncanny sense of responsibility and her powers of suggestion, this American art provocateur speaks softly but carries a big shtick.
Interview by Stephanie Murg
Portraits by Josep Fonti

OLE SCHEEREN
After almost 15 years in Asia this meister-builder is back West, walking the tightrope of commerce, community, high density, and economy of scale.
Interview by Katya Tylevich
Portraits by Lyndsy Welgos

Also in the issue:
On the cover, a trompe l’oeil chalet by Caruso St. John; the Bolivian cholets by architect Freddy Mamani, reinterpreted by Jonathan Castro; Philippe Rahm’s new decorative style for the Anthropocene; the beauty of doilies; a display of 20th-century Yugoslav architecture; lounging with a family of Telfar Art Mannequins; an interview with artist Jacolby Satterwhite; Home sweet homes by Leon Ransmeier and Robert Stadler; Bodys Isek Kingelez’s model worlds; LOT-EK’s take on housing in Johannesburg; the witty designs of BNAG; a villa by little known Swedish architect Sigurd Lewerentz; new homes by Vector Architects and Arno Brandlhuber; Christen Mooney’s controversial tapestries; new work by Thomas Barger; exploring model homes with Camiel Duytschaever; Timon and Melchior Grau’s brotherly act; Adam Charlap Hyman’s passion for miniatures; African American home life seen through the lens of art; and Virgil Abloh explained.

Plus, an all-American home story with Calvin Klein Home and a supplement on Luigi Caccia Dominioni’s furniture design.

Film by Tyler Mariano for PIN–UP.